TITLE

Labor and Defense

PUB. DATE
December 1941
SOURCE
New Republic;12/8/41, Vol. 105 Issue 23, p751
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents information on labor legislation. Debates on compulsory arbitration and penalties for strikes; Backing of the labor leadership for the successful implementation of the social objectives of the U.S. administration; Struggle between John L. Lewis, head of the United Mine Workers, and Philip Murray, president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), for the leadership in CIO; Support for the U.S. foreign policy by CIO and American Federation of Labor; Demand by labor for active participation in policy-making; Danger of labor-management collusion.
ACCESSION #
14692144

 

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