TITLE

The Next Big Job

PUB. DATE
June 1942
SOURCE
New Republic;6/1/42, Vol. 106 Issue 22, p750
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that the next practical task in Washington is to mobilize the competence and energy to put meaning into the peace and get that meaning across to the peoples of the world. Publication of pamphlets on the subject of domestic post-war policy by the National Resources Planning Board; Emphasis on the importance of nominating and electing the kind of U.S. Congress that can win the war; Statement that the amount of damage that can be done by a conservative minority is limited by the stern imperatives of military necessity.
ACCESSION #
14690107

 

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