TITLE

Lewis Faces a Fight

AUTHOR(S)
Lahey, Edwin A.
PUB. DATE
May 1942
SOURCE
New Republic;5/18/42, Vol. 106 Issue 20, p665
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the political ambitions of U.S. labor leader John L. Lewis. Description of political differences between Philip Murray, president of Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) and Lewis; Demand made by Lewis to Murray to take action against CIO unionists who had been guilty of uttering unkind remarks in public about the Sage of Alexandria; Expectation of CIO people from Lewis to bring his fight out into the open before May 19, when the Steel Workers' Organizing Committee meets to become a constitutional union.
ACCESSION #
14689910

 

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