TITLE

Isolationists and the Peace

PUB. DATE
November 1943
SOURCE
New Republic;11/29/43, Vol. 109 Issue 22, p778
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents information on the effect of isolationism in the U.S. on the postwar period. Information on the debate on the Fulbright Resolution in the House and the Congress; Demand for an alliance with Great Britain; Criticism of the U.S. administration and the way in which the war is being fought; Implications of indulging in isolationism; Dependence for raw materials on other countries; Impact of a probable failure of the U.S. to participate in world affairs.
ACCESSION #
14687320

 

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