TITLE

Grand Strategy at Washington

PUB. DATE
June 1943
SOURCE
New Republic;6/7/43, Vol. 108 Issue 23, p750
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the grand strategy made by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and English Prime Minister Winston Churchill regarding air war. Comments on Churchill's speech to Congress which indicates that the answer to the controversy over air war is bombing or invasion; Reports that final authorities on strategy appear to have declined to choose between the alternatives of offensive action against Germany or Japan; Risk taken by Roosevelt in adopting a program of production for total war; Decision to begin operations by cleaning the Axis out of Africa and ensuring passage through the Mediterranean.
ACCESSION #
14683005

 

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