TITLE

Art in Wartime

AUTHOR(S)
Mccausland, Elizabeth
PUB. DATE
May 1944
SOURCE
New Republic;5/15/44, Vol. 110 Issue 20, p676
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the condition of the art during the World War II in the U.S. Declaration by American museum directors that museums operations would be maintained during the war; Concerns over growing decentralization of art in the U.S.; Effects of Americanism on the art in the U.S.; Information on the public and private patronage of the art in the war years; Comments on the economic structure of museums; Information on the financial reports of several museums; Description of attendance at various museums; Importance of art activities which serve as ambassadors of good will to foreign countries.
ACCESSION #
14673341

 

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