TITLE

From Warsaw to Paris

PUB. DATE
September 1944
SOURCE
New Republic;9/11/44, Vol. 111 Issue 11, p295
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on uprising of undergrounds in Warsaw and Paris. Military victories of the Allied armies in Eastern and Western Europe presage an early end of the war against Germany; Attitude of the Anglo-American bloc on the one hand and of the Soviet Union on the other, toward the underground and liberation movements; Apprehensions of the people of Warsaw about intentions of their foreign liberators; Absence of any aid from Russians to Poles during the revolt; Breakdown of negotiations between the Government-in-Exile and the Soviet-sponsored Polish Committee of National Liberation; Agreement between the French Committee of National Liberation and Great Britain and the U.S. making possible the inclusion of the French Forces of the Interior in the Allied array under General Dwight D. Eisenhower; Refusal of Soviet Union to arm the Polish underground or to grant bases to Great Britain and the U.S. from which they might send weapons into Nazi-held Poland.
ACCESSION #
14659716

 

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