TITLE

The Facts in the Maritime Crisis

PUB. DATE
June 1946
SOURCE
New Republic;6/17/46, Vol. 114 Issue 24, p858
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents facts about the strike threatened by the Committee for Maritime Unity in the U.S. Details of the original demands by the employees; Reasons for the made demands; Claim of the employers that granting the unions' hour demands would drastically reduce the normal duties of practically every seaman; Claim by ship operators that the basic pay on American ships is two and one-half times higher than that on foreign vessels; Claim by the unions that the average rate of profit of the major shipping companies was 80 percent during the war, as compared with less than 10 percent in American industry generally; Proposal by the operators to offer an increase of $12.50 a month in basic wages, increases of from five to 15 cents an hour in overtime and a cut in working hours for the stewards' department from nine hours work, in a span of thirteen hours, to eight hours.
ACCESSION #
14652796

 

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