TITLE

If We Can Only Stay Awake

PUB. DATE
October 1960
SOURCE
New Republic;10/31/60, Vol. 143 Issue 19, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the foreign policy of the U.S. towards Cuba. Effects of the Cuban embargo; Statement that the Cuban affair proves that the American people do not know where they stand in relation to Latin America; Danger to the nation by the loss of Communism in Latin America; Discouragement of the idea of a military attack by the policy of containment; Comment that the assumption that a military attack is the only recourse available to Communism was a gross error.
ACCESSION #
14607459

 

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