TITLE

Can Hammarskjold Hold On?

AUTHOR(S)
Rossi, Mario
PUB. DATE
October 1960
SOURCE
New Republic;10/10/60, Vol. 143 Issue 16, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the Soviet attack against Secretary General of the United Nations (UN) Dag Hammarskjold and the demand for reform at his office. Need to change the UN Charter to fulfill the Soviet demand; Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev's attitude towards the world organization; Proposal to replace the Secretary General; Plans to reorganize the principles and aims of the UN; Hammarskjold's plan to use preventive diplomacy to reduce the areas of conflict between the two opposing power blocs.
ACCESSION #
14602939

 

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