TITLE

SUING THE MEDIA, SUPPORTING THE FIRST AMENDMENT: THE PARADOX OF NEVILLE JOHNSON AND THE BATTLE FOR PRIVACY

AUTHOR(S)
Richards, Robert D.; Calvert, Clay
PUB. DATE
May 2004
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2004, Vol. 67 Issue 4, p1097
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents an interview with privacy litigator Neville Johnson about his views on lawsuits against the media and the purpose of free press under the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Status of judicial and legislative protection for the press; Quality of journalism and the use of newsgathering practices in the U.S.; Challenges faced by the lawyers of plaintiffs when suing the media.
ACCESSION #
14593441

 

Related Articles

  • Inducing a Constructive Press in Singapore: Responsibility over Freedom. Tey Tsun Hang // Australian Journal of Asian Law (Federation Press Pty Limited);Dec2008, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p202 

    The Singapore political leadership has moulded a sophisticated press control regime that befits its 'pragmatic' political ideology based on the primacy of executive leadership and limited freedom of expression. This article -- using Singapore's constitutional and legal framework and political...

  • Legal Constraints on the Press In Post-Junta Greece, 1974-77. Paraschos, Manny // Journalism Quarterly;Spring83, Vol. 60 Issue 1, p48 

    Presents and analyzes the laws that affected free expression and the press in post-junta Greece along with the most prominent cases. Transition from the military dictatorship to a renewed dedication to democratic principles; Dissemination of ideas through the press; Confidentiality and libel in...

  • The unresolved battle.  // Columbia Journalism Review;Sep/Oct1971, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p2 

    This article offers a look at issues surrounding the press in the U.S. as of September 1971. The press and news broadcasting won two qualified victories in the summer of 1971. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the right of the press, in a particular instance, to publish material that the government...

  • Press Council Act, 1978.  // Global Media Journal: Indian Edition;Jun2011, p1 

    The article provides an overview of the Press Council Act, 1978 which is established to preserve freedom of the press and maintain and improve the standards of newspapers and news agencies in India. The act establishes a council named Press Council of India. Objectives and functions of the...

  • Checkbook Journalism.  // Time;3/23/1962, Vol. 79 Issue 12, p78 

    The article focuses on the publication of big criminal cases in Great Britain. It mentions that the publication was a result of the country's laws governing coverage of crime, in which any paper that goes beyond the testimony risks heavy fines and severe punishment. It argues that the law urges...

  • Defamation Law in Bhutan: Some Reflections. Iyer, Venkat // Journal of Bhutan Studies;Summer2008, Vol. 18, p82 

    The article discusses a court case in Bhutan which involves its defamation and media law. The Thimpu District Court and High Court presided over the case in which the respective performances of both courts were considered promising even if the nascent legal infrastructure of the country has...

  • Monopoly games-where failures win big. Barnett, Stephen R. // Columbia Journalism Review;May/Jun1980, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p41 

    The article looks at the two trials in Cincinnati, Ohio and San Francisco, California under the Newspaper Preservation Act (NPA) in the U.S. Enactment of the NPA was triggered by the U.S. Supreme Court's 1969 decision in the Citizen Publishing case, involving the joint-operating agreement...

  • Freedom of the Press. . . televised executions. Ashman, Allan // American Bar Association Journal;May77, Vol. 63 Issue 5, p708 

    Reports on the ruling of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas on the case, Garrett v. Estelle. Court's decision that a television news reporter must be permitted to witness and film an execution wherever one occurs in Texas; Case background; Court's issuance of a...

  • Appellate court levels blow against college press rights. Corrigan, Don // St. Louis Journalism Review;Jul/Aug2005, Vol. 35 Issue 278, p21 

    Advocates of free press rights for college newspapers are expressing outrage over the June 2005 ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit in the case Hosty v. Carter, which gives college administrators the right to restrict the free speech rights of student newspapers. Student...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics