TITLE

THE SPOILS OF FAWNS

AUTHOR(S)
Mizener, Arthur
PUB. DATE
August 1952
SOURCE
New Republic;8/18/52, Vol. 127 Issue 7, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article analyzes the book "The Golden Bowl," by Henry Jameson, on the conditions and aspirations of human life as seen in the actions of men and women of more than usual worth and risk. In this book , a comparison between two fictious characters--Maggie and Beatrice is made. The book has been concerned with the way Maggie, starting as an innocent girl, loving the Prince as much as she can--which, with her innocent ignorance, is not much--learns from her own immediate personal experience. With Beatrice the concern is with the possession and use of such love; with Maggie with its birth and development.
ACCESSION #
14496461

 

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