TITLE

MAIMING THE BARD

AUTHOR(S)
Bentley, Eric
PUB. DATE
September 1952
SOURCE
New Republic;9/22/52, Vol. 127 Issue 12, p27
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the expedience of dramatist William Shakespeare's literary work in modern context. It explores the potentiality of playing and staging Shakespeare without maiming the original interpretation. It is implied that even the most popular and perennial of Shakespeare's plays can be properly understood only in the light of Elizabethan history, psychology, physiology, demonology, and the understanding of Shakespeare is limited to scholars only. Concept of modern production of the histories is not suitable for Shakespeare's masterpieces.
ACCESSION #
14495875

 

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