TITLE

EISENHOWER MOVES RIGHT

AUTHOR(S)
Lahey, Edwin A.
PUB. DATE
September 1952
SOURCE
New Republic;9/22/52, Vol. 127 Issue 12, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on political campaigns in the United States where Presidential candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower remarkably fortified the Republican Party for the coming Presidential elections. In Indianapolis, Eisenhower had an embarrassing time but presented himself in highly diplomatic cum social manner. He promised Senator Robert Taft that there would be no discrimination against Taft supporters if he were elected. When asked by a reporter, Eisenhower showed ignorance about injunctions in labor law but immediately he nailed down on the specific phases of it.
ACCESSION #
14495813

 

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