TITLE

Statesmen & Politicians

AUTHOR(S)
Johnson, Gerald W.
PUB. DATE
December 1955
SOURCE
New Republic;12/12/55, Vol. 133 Issue 24, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article analyzes moderate speeches and the statesmanship of American politicians. Nobody objects to the moderation of the President Dwight D. Eisenhower Administration, what people, object to is its moral insensitivity, rising at times close to moral indecency. Harry S. Truman was denounced with unmeasured violence for having Caudle there in the first place, and he did not put up much of a defense, for in his heart he knew that he had it coming. It is not enough to be a statesman to be elected President, one has to be a good politician too, and to hit the obvious error of the opposition is better politics than to hit an error that may be more dangerous to the country, but is not so glaringly evident to the voting public.
ACCESSION #
14493473

 

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