TITLE

GERALD W. JOHNSON: The Superficial Aspect

AUTHOR(S)
Johnson, Gerald W.
PUB. DATE
December 1953
SOURCE
New Republic;12/21/53, Vol. 129 Issue 21, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents information on some political developments in the U.S. It is informed that in January 1953, U.S. President, Dwight D. Eisenhower had the Democratic Party under his command. Even in Congress during the first session a majority of Democrats voting in one house or the other at one time or another supported the President's proposals not once but nearly 60 times. Repeatedly their support enabled him to beat off attacks by members of his own party. In short, there was no appreciable partisan opposition. Politically, it was an ideal situation worth preserving at almost any cost.
ACCESSION #
14472092

 

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