TITLE

A Sharp Tongue, a Hot Temper and a Tender Heart

AUTHOR(S)
Douglas, Paul H.
PUB. DATE
December 1953
SOURCE
New Republic;12/21/53, Vol. 129 Issue 21, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents information on the publication of the dairy maintained by Harold L. Ickes. The said dairy narrates every single details of the administrative procedures of the U.S. government headed by Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the U.S. It is opined that the diary presents a brutal description of what was happening inside Rossevelt's administration. Ickes was no respector of persons, and he was in addition something of a feudist. Therefore the diaries are full of caustic comment about the men with whom he clashed. During the concluding pages of the diary, one notes the growing rivalry between Ickes and Harry Hopkins. This conflict was perhaps inevitable. Hopkins was primarily concerned with relief; Ickes with public works. Ickes wanted substantial projects which would have great worth and be honestly and economically constructed.
ACCESSION #
14472024

 

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