TITLE

THE COMMUNIST STRUGGLE TO CAPTURE ROME

AUTHOR(S)
Shearer, Robert
PUB. DATE
May 1952
SOURCE
New Republic;5/19/52, Vol. 126 Issue 20, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on some of the political developments in Rome, Italy. On May 25, Rome's electors go to the polls to choose a new municipal government. The propaganda battle between Communists and Catholics has already reached heights of the bitterest invective. There is, a real possibility that the Communist Party may take over the municipal government in this city which is the seat of the Pope, and the center of a great and vital nation of the North Atlantic Alliance. These Rome elections may be shaped by a protest, movement that dominates part of central, and all of southern Italy.
ACCESSION #
14457041

 

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