TITLE

ON THE AIR

AUTHOR(S)
Carson, Saul
PUB. DATE
March 1952
SOURCE
New Republic;3/24/52, Vol. 126 Issue 12, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the gradual development and gained popularity of TV viewership and compares it that of radio broadcasts. Radio is dead only as far as the TV-awed broadcasters are concerned. Potential listeners still outnumber possible viewers by seven to one; as of the first of the year, there were 105 million radio receivers in the U.S. The number of television stations in the U.S. has grown in the last half decade from 8 to 108; but in the same period, radio broadcast outlets (including those on the standard amplitude modulation, band, as well as FM) increased in number from 1,520 to 3,058. It is only qualitatively, and principally on the network level that radio has really deteriorated. TV is a potent competitor and will be a tougher one soon. For the members of the audience, that means closer attention to what's on the air, on Radio or TV, and faster and more articulate reaction.
ACCESSION #
14454641

 

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