TITLE

STILL TALKING

AUTHOR(S)
Davis, Joe Lee
PUB. DATE
March 1952
SOURCE
New Republic;3/24/52, Vol. 126 Issue 12, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the thematic and literary fineness of the book "Quiet, Please," by James Branch Cabell. The protagonist of Cabell's fifty- first book is his own stream of consciousness at the age of seventy-two. His antagonist is "sense-slackening Time" or "gelded and gelding Time" who keeps interjecting, "Quiet, please." To say that such a collection of amiable slight informal essays, held thus loosely together by thematic counter-point and refrain, comes very close to being an autobiography, is to fail just short of what in Cabellese might be called perpetrating a pardonable tarradiddle. The twelve chapters of "Quiet, Please," fall into three groups of four each.
ACCESSION #
14454633

 

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