TITLE

The Nearness of Midnight

AUTHOR(S)
Finletter, Thomas K.
PUB. DATE
February 1955
SOURCE
New Republic;2/21/55, Vol. 132 Issue 8, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the book "Two Minutes Till Midnight," by Elmer Davis. Midnight, in the title "Two Minutes Till Midnight," is when the hydrogen war starts. Conceivably there may be no hydrogen war, but just conceivably. There is no proof "that the hydrogen bomb will ever be used, though I confess that at this moment I cannot see why not." Nor, it seems to the author, can anyone else who thinks about the subject. Davis makes the point that people had better damn well be sure that when the hydrogen war comes the United States will win it.
ACCESSION #
14444026

 

Related Articles

  • TWO MINUTES TILL MIDNIGHT. RYAN JR., JOHN J. // America;4/30/1955, Vol. 93 Issue 5, p134 

    The article reviews the book "Two Minutes Till Midnight," by Elmer Davis.

  • COMMENT ON THE WEEK.  // America;12/18/1943, Vol. 70 Issue 11, p281 

    The article presents newsbriefs including the Director of Office of War Information Elmer Davis' news fiasco at Cairo and Teheran. Argentina is uncooperative with the Inter-American solidarity due to self-interest, fear and local crisis. Quality controls have put more difficulty in the economy...

  • Our Darkest Days.  // New Republic;8/17/42, Vol. 107 Issue 7, p190 

    Focuses on the failures and achievements of the U.S. after the Civil War, as pointed out by Elmer Davis at his first official roundup as head of the Office of War Information. Expansion of plant capacity and reduction in civilian production; Reasons for the inadequacy of shipments to the Soviet...

  • WASHINGTON FRONT. Parsons, Wilfrid // America;8/15/1942, Vol. 67 Issue 19, p509 

    The article reports on the important role of the U.S. Office of War Information (OWI) director Elmer Davis. Davis is a public information officer of the government who becomes the defender of the Navy and the Army when they made public news during the World War II. His office has been also...

  • FUNDS FOR OWI.  // America;10/30/1943, Vol. 70 Issue 4, p99 

    The article reflects on the 1943 fund for the Office of War Information (OWI) as part of the propaganda effort on postwar program in the U.S. It depicts that propaganda effort is necessary to fight the war of the airwaves with little amount of money. It notes the situation in which the head of...

  • What Can an Intelligent Teacher Do about the War? Davis, Elmer // Education Digest;May1955, Vol. 20 Issue 9, p29 

    The article presents the speech of Elmer Davis, Director of the Office of War Information, before the National Institute on Education and War, on August 30, 1942, at Washington, D.C., on what intelligent teachers can do about the war. It is argued that teachers need to teach their students, to...

  • Elmer Davis on the Air. White, Paul W.; Barrett, Edward W.; Crosby, John; Harsch, Joseph C. // New Republic;1/18/54, Vol. 130 Issue 3, p10 

    In this article a number of media professionals comment on the radio reporter Elmer Davis and his return to public life and to his broadcast career. Davis' service as a foreign correspondent is described, as is his service during the Second World War as director of the Office of War Information,...

  • A Job for Elmer Davis.  // New Republic;6/22/42, Vol. 106 Issue 25, p847 

    Focuses on the selection of Elmer Davis, the best radio news commentators and a liberal respected by conservatives, for management of the Office of War Information as a result of reorganization of war information services in the United States to provide information about the Second World War....

  • A Job for Elmer Davis.  // New Republic;6/22/42, Vol. 106 Issue 25, p847 

    Focuses on the selection of Elmer Davis, the best radio news commentators and a liberal respected by conservatives, for management of the Office of War Information as a result of reorganization of war information services in the United States to provide information about the Second World War....

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics