TITLE

The Three Acts Of Mr. Khrushchev

AUTHOR(S)
Sherman, George
PUB. DATE
August 1959
SOURCE
New Republic;8/10/59, Vol. 141 Issue 6/7, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on the activities of Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev during his ceremonial State visit to Poland in July 1959. First, he gave "glad to be here" posture, reserved for welcomes in city, town and village. He graciously accepts the extended bouquet of red carnations. Next come vigorous handshakes or the true Slavic bear hug passed all around the reception committee. If the audience is lucky, they are treated to a few well-chosen words on some subject close to their hearts. Khrushchev has also been a farmer. So, two days later he was equally at ease trading stories with farmers outside Pozsan about corn husking and the latest agricultural techniques.
ACCESSION #
14440304

 

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