TITLE

‘The Two O'Clock Vibe’: Embodying the Jam of Musical Blackness In and Out of Its Everyday Context

AUTHOR(S)
Graunt, Kyra D.
PUB. DATE
September 2002
SOURCE
Musical Quarterly;Fall2002, Vol. 86 Issue 3, p372
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Describes the phenomenological encounters that shape learning about African American popular music in the U.S. Critique on social relations and matters of racial and gender difference that arise in classrooms; Discussion of the alternative black culture that is not marketed widely to the public; Effect of music on the people who listened to it.
ACCESSION #
14425260

 

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