TITLE

Why I am for Stevenson

AUTHOR(S)
Schlesinger Sr., Arthur M.
PUB. DATE
October 1956
SOURCE
New Republic;10/29/56, Vol. 135 Issue 18, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on presidential elections in the U.S. during 1956. The most important reason for preferring Adlai Stevenson to Eisenhower is taken from the foreign rather than the domestic situation. People are choosing Stevenson as their next President because of the continued dominance of the Republican party by illeberal forces, a condition that led President Dwight D. Eisenhower to consider forming a new party, and if Vice President Richard Nixon should succeed to the presidency, a man unfit for the office would inherit it. A change of Administration and Stevenson's leadership may not eliminate perils but it can at least cope with them more adequately than now under the various slogans of complacency.
ACCESSION #
14421951

 

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