TITLE

These Be Thy Gods, 0 Israel - I

AUTHOR(S)
Graves, Robert
PUB. DATE
February 1956
SOURCE
New Republic;2/27/56, Vol. 134 Issue 9, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents the author's views on the history of literature, particularly the writings on poetry. In 1910, when the author first made poetry the most important thing in his life no idols were forced on me. English literature did not form part of the curriculum at Charterhouse. According to him the young William Butler Yeats had wit, industry, a flexible mind, a good ear, and the gift of falling romantically in love-- admirable qualities for a beginner. His less admirable qualities were greed, impatience, and a lack of proportion, or humor, for which no amount of wit can compensate. The early poems fall short of the bathetic only by their genuine feeling for Ireland and their irreproachable anvil-craft.
ACCESSION #
14409335

 

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