TITLE

Economist Joel Naroff sees a reasonably good year ahead

AUTHOR(S)
Hegarty, Liam
PUB. DATE
December 1998
SOURCE
Fairfield County Business Journal;12/21/98, Vol. 37 Issue 51, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Shares economic forecasts of First Union National Bank economist, Joel L. Naroff for the United States in 1999. Financial problems in 1998; Direction of the global economy; International trade as a cause of concern; Market performance and consumer expectations; Year 2000 date conversion problem.
ACCESSION #
1421109

 

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