TITLE

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF MILITARY INTELLIGENCE

AUTHOR(S)
Crockett, Harvey L.
PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin;Apr-Jun2004, Vol. 30 Issue 2, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Provides information on the duties and responsibilities of the Office of the Chief of Military Intelligence (OCMI) or Personnel Proponency Office under the U.S. Army. Areas of personnel proponency responsibility; Functions of OCMI; Project of OCMI in line with the military Occupational Classification and Structure packets.
ACCESSION #
14165381

 

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