TITLE

"WHAT WE HAVE SEEN HAS BEEN TERRIBLE" PUBLIC PRESENTATIONAL TORTURE AND THE COMMUNICATIVE LOGIC OF STATE TERROR

AUTHOR(S)
Rothenberg, Daniel
PUB. DATE
December 2003
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2003, Vol. 67 Issue 2, p465
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents debates over the legitimacy of torture. Introduction of the idea of public presentational torture as a practice that reveals key elements of the logic of torture; Arguments for the possible use of torture; Significance of the international human rights system and the validity of the universal prohibition on torture.
ACCESSION #
14016812

 

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