TITLE

How the Fight for the Senate Looks Now

AUTHOR(S)
Cook, Charlie
PUB. DATE
December 1998
SOURCE
National Journal;12/05/98, Vol. 30 Issue 49, p2882
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines possible election results for the United States Senate for the year 2000. Biggest variable in the Senate outlook; Details on the planned retirement of Democrat Daniel Patrick Moynihan; Democrats being watched for signs as to wether they will run again.
ACCESSION #
1388450

 

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