TITLE

Delaying tobacco harvest may improve bottom line

AUTHOR(S)
Yaney Jr., Cecil H.
PUB. DATE
July 2004
SOURCE
Southeast Farm Press;7/21/2004, Vol. 31 Issue 18, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
If there's a question about when to harvest tobacco, wait. Holding the tobacco crop a little longer in the field can add to one's bottom line, as well as make one looks better in the eyes of manufacturers. A long-term study associated with the Official Variety Trials is taking on new significance in the era of contracting, where manufacturers are requiring riper tobacco and more tip grades, says David Smith, North Carolina State University Extension tobacco specialist. Researchers Smith, Glenn Tart, Ken Barnes and Loren Fisher looked at how holding 10 varieties in the field affected yield and quality of the upper-stalk tobacco. The researchers conducted the study at the Border Belt Tobacco Research Station in Whiteville, North Carolina.
ACCESSION #
13863577

 

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