TITLE

Everything balances out in nature

AUTHOR(S)
Byford, Jim
PUB. DATE
July 2004
SOURCE
Southeast Farm Press;7/21/2004, Vol. 31 Issue 18, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Nature has a way of compensating for unfavorable conditions. For example studies have shown that female coyotes becoming established in a new area will have more pups per litter while the population is low, than they will later when the population has stabilized. In a natural cycle, such as animal population density, lows are followed by highs. When the difference between the lows and the highs is small, it is considered that the natural condition to be in relative equilibrium. It is to be kept in mind that only the fittest, best equipped animals, predators or prey and plants survive tough times.
ACCESSION #
13863547

 

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