TITLE

Hackers sharpen their blades

PUB. DATE
May 2004
SOURCE
Management Services;May2004, Vol. 48 Issue 5, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article provides information on the findings from the 2004 British Department of Trade and Industry's biennial Information Security Breaches Survey, conducted by a consortium led by PricewaterhouseCoopers. Roughly one in ten large companies had a significant fraud or breach in confidentiality. More than half of all companies affected said it was their worst incident of the year, even outweighing virus infections. Confidentiality breaches caused significant business disruption and took significant staff time to investigate, on average 10 to 20 man-days. These breaches also incurred the biggest direct cash cost of any security incident. The surveyors found the main cause to be the number of users and systems putting user administration processes under strain but they said automating user provisioning appears to work. None of the respondents that had done this had suffered financial frauds or systems penetration from outside in 2003. But a close second cause is over-reliance on passwords to check users' identity. Some 87% of all companies rely solely on user identification and password, while 7% have no controls at all. Tokens, smart cards and biometrics are little used but where they are, unauthorized access breaches drop from 20% to just 3%.
ACCESSION #
13700389

 

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