TITLE

Common Cold no excuse for time off say employers

PUB. DATE
June 2004
SOURCE
Management Services;Jun2004, Vol. 48 Issue 6, p7
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports that eighty-eight percent of British employers are ignoring physicians' advice, by stating a heavy cold is not a good enough reason to take time off work, according to a survey conducted by Croner. The medical profession advises that, for the fastest recovery, people suffering from a bad cold should stay in bed, take medication and plenty of fluids. But the survey of human resource professionals carried out via Croner's Web site discovered that only 12% were in favor of employees keeping their germs at home. Croner is alerting employers that such a ruling is adding to a growing martyr culture, where people drag themselves in to work and consequently spread sickness around the workplace. Such a view is supported by the TUC, which characterized people bringing their illness into the office as mucus troopers. Richard Smith, employment expert at Croner, believes that the fear of taking time off, even when workers are clearly unwell, is adding to stress and anxiety at work. Such a mind set is also reinforcing the fact that Great Britain is one of the hardest working nations in Europe, despite some research which suggests such long hours do not necessarily lead to increased productivity.
ACCESSION #
13700257

 

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