TITLE

HOW TO FIND A CAREER AFTER MILITARY SERVICE

AUTHOR(S)
Horton, John L.
PUB. DATE
July 2004
SOURCE
U.S. Naval Institute Proceedings;Jul2004, Vol. 130 Issue 7, p40
SOURCE TYPE
Conference Proceeding
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A job-search campaign after leaving the military is likely to seem fraught with more peril, heartache, and hardships than military life ever did. The truth is, many former servicemen and women will be unemployed, partially unemployed or underemployed during their first years out of the military. Someone with average skills and salary requirements should spend 30 to 40 hours a week on his or her search. A job-search campaign likely will last between three and nine months or about a month for every $10,000 in salary desired.
ACCESSION #
13699315

 

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