TITLE

TBMA: Fed Funds May Hit 3% Next June

AUTHOR(S)
Newman, Emily
PUB. DATE
June 2004
SOURCE
Bond Buyer;6/30/2004, Vol. 348 Issue 31916, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that the Federal Open Market will raise its fed funds rate and continue to raise the target rate by December according to a survey of the Bond Market Association's economic advisory committee. Indication that Fed is satisfied that the pace of economic growth is sustainable; Outlook for inflation; Yields on 10-year Treasury notes.
ACCESSION #
13637652

 

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