TITLE

Addressing California's Uncertain Water Future by Coordinating Long-Term Land Use and Water Planning: Is a Water Element in the General Plan the Next Step?

AUTHOR(S)
Waterman, Ryan
PUB. DATE
February 2004
SOURCE
Ecology Law Quarterly;2004, Vol. 31 Issue 1, p117
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
More people, less water: this is the widely anticipated future of the state of California. As the state's population grows to 46 million by the year 2020, California will strive to meet water demand with a reduced water supply from the Colorado River, and struggle with the devastating impacts to the Sierra Nevada snow pack caused by global warming. Yet is California preparing for this future today? Does the law direct land-use planners on the city and county levels to work in concert with their water planning counterparts to prepare for these significant challenges? As concern over these issues has grown, recent judicial and legislative action has added new substantive requirements for land-use and water planning, as well as adding procedural requirements that ask land use and water planners to communicate with one another more consistently. In addition, both the Governor's Office of Planning and Research (OPR) and the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) are currently updating influential reference documents for land use and water planning professionals. This Comment seizes this timely juncture to analyze the legal requirements for long-term land use and water planning in California. It also evaluates a proposal to add a water element as the eighth element of the general plan process for cities and counties. It concludes by offering an opinion to both the OPR and DWR on the efficacy of a water element in the general plan process as a means of improving the connection between land use and water planning.
ACCESSION #
13517350

 

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