TITLE

Life still goes on without 'vital' DNA

AUTHOR(S)
Westphal, Sylvia Pagán
PUB. DATE
June 2004
SOURCE
New Scientist;6/5/2004, Vol. 182 Issue 2450, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Recently researchers revealed that they had deleted huge chunks of the genome of mice without it making any discernable difference to the animals. All DNA tends to acquire random mutations, but if these occur in a region that has an important function, individuals will not survive. Key sequences should thus remain virtually unchanged, even between species. So by comparing the genomes of different species and looking for regions that are conserved, geneticists hope to pick out those that have an important function. To find out the function of some of these highly conserved non-protein-coding regions in mammals, Edward Rubin's team at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California deleted two huge regions of junk DNA from mice containing nearly 1000 highly conserved sequences shared between human and mice.
ACCESSION #
13453158

 

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