TITLE

Kwame Ture, Civil Rights Leader Who Coined 'Black Power,' Dies

PUB. DATE
November 1998
SOURCE
Jet;11/30/98, Vol. 95 Issue 1, p5
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the death of Kwame Ture, who, when he was known as Stokely Carmichael, coined the phrase Black Power for the Civil Rights Movement. Ture's battle with prostate cancer; His birth in Trinidad and his early years; His college years at Howard University; His role with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in the 1960s; Why Ture cut his ties with American groups; His marriage to singer Miriam Makeba; Quote from Reverend Jesse Jackson.
ACCESSION #
1330313

 

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