TITLE

MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAMS INCREASE REFERRAL RATES AND IMPROVE OUTCOMES OF TREATMENT FOR OESOPHAGOGASTRIC CANCER

PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Gut;Apr2004 Supplement 3, Vol. 53, pA116
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article cites a study conducted to compare outcomes for patients diagnosed with oesophagogastric cancer and managed by a multidisciplinary team (MDT), with outcomes of patients managed by clinicians independently prior to the inception of a MDT in a large British cancer unit. Results of the study underscore the impact of multiprofessional teams in refining preoperative diagnoses and stage, optimal case selection, and peri-operative care for patients with oesophagogostric cancer.
ACCESSION #
13219268

 

Related Articles

  • Chest pain. Singer, Karl // Patient Care;Feb2003, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p6 

    Presents information on the significance of the quality of diagnostic test to come up with a correct diagnosis. Role of physicians in asserting the correct diagnosis; Information on a scenario where proper diagnosis was executed.

  • The existential plight of cancer: meaning making as a concrete approach to the intangible search for meaning.  // Supportive Care in Cancer;Jul2008, Vol. 16 Issue 7, p779 

    Abstract Introduction  Despite modern advances that have led to improved prognoses and symptom management, a cancer diagnosis continues to evoke images of pain, suffering, and death. Discussion  The current literature suggests that the “existential plight of cancer”...

  • Treating More than the Tumour: The Role of Technology in Efficient Cancer Care. Parker, Brent; Weisstock, Christina // UBC Medical Journal;Sep2013, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p37 

    A cancer diagnosis substantially impacts patients and their families, often disrupting life and work routines and intensifying psychological distress. It is becoming increasingly recognized that support, empowerment and communication are critical components of patient- centered care, and are...

  • A visual summary of the EUROCARE-4 results: a UK perspective. Møller, H.; Linklater, K. M.; Robinson, D. // British Journal of Cancer;12/3/2009 Supplement 2, Vol. 101, pS110 

    Background:This paper provides a one-page visual summary of the previously published relative survival estimates for 42 types of cancers in 23 countries in Europe.Methods:The cancer patients in these analyses were 15 years or older at the time of their diagnosis in the period 1995–1999....

  • All you need to know about breast cancer screening. Silver, Lisa // Medeconomics;Jul2004, Vol. 25 Issue 7, p52 

    The article presents information on breast cancer screening. During the summer of 2004, all PCTs, along with acute, specialist, ambulance and mental health trusts in England, will once again receive their performance rating or star rating. The starting point for the modernisation of cancer...

  • Health Status After Cancer: Does It Matter Which Hospital You Belong To? Fiva, Jon H.; Hægeland, Torbjørn; Rønning, Marte // BMC Health Services Research;2010, Vol. 10, p204 

    Background: Survival rates are widely used to compare the quality of cancer care. However, the extent to which cancer survivors regain full physical or cognitive functioning is not captured by this statistic. To address this concern we introduce post-diagnosis employment as a supplemental...

  • Barriers to good sickness certification – an interview study with Swedish general practitioners. Swartling, Malin S.; Alexanderson, Kristina A. E.; Wahlstrom, Rolf A. // Scandinavian Journal of Public Health;Sep2008, Vol. 36 Issue 7, p1 

    Background: To date, there is no gold standard for sick-listing practices, and physicians find sickness certification problematic. Measures have been taken to improve physician's sick-listing practices, but with ambiguous results. To be able to make such interventions effective, it is important...

  • "Specific and Directed" Versus "All-Inclusive"  // Clinical Pediatrics;Feb1970, Vol. 9 Issue 2, p65 

    The article presents information on the necessity to understand any case related to illness in details by new physicians. Unless the speaker has a shining personality, the result is a difficult-to-follow enumeration of a variety of clinical syndromes which bores the speaker as well as the...

  • "There's a bug in my ear"--and other unforgettable house calls. Wassersug, Joseph D. // Medical Economics;4/8/2005, Vol. 82 Issue 7, p68 

    Relates the experience of the author, an internist, from visiting patients at their homes in the U.S. Technique used to get the bug out of the ear of a 46-year-old female alcoholic; Causal factor for the asbestosis of patient Mary Johnson; Health effect of taking care a schizophrenic sister on...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics