TITLE

Navy Combat Demolition Units Prepared the Way for D-Day

AUTHOR(S)
Winkler, David F.
PUB. DATE
May 2004
SOURCE
Sea Power;May2004, Vol. 47 Issue 5, p52
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Provides a historical account on the role of the U.S. Navy Combat Demolition Units (NCDU) that preceded the invasion force of the June 6, 1944, D-Day landings in Normandy, France. Number of NCDU that arrived in England from Fort Pierce, Florida; Heroic actions of the NCDU at the Omaha Beach.
ACCESSION #
13126801

 

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