TITLE

Hot Spots in Critical Condition

AUTHOR(S)
Schwartz, Ephraim
PUB. DATE
May 2004
SOURCE
InfoWorld;5/3/2004, Vol. 26 Issue 18, p16
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents the author's opinion on the alleged capabilities of broadband data over cellular networks in the U.S. Last August, I gave the reasons why wireless hot spots would not survive. Stubbornly, public Wireless-Fidelity (Wi-Fi) access providers do not agree. They still see the hundreds of thousands of storefronts that lack access points as green fields waiting to be plowed. It is a mirage. Just because you build it does not mean they will come. But did not Wayport Technologies just land a big deal with McDonald's to install hot spots in their burger joints around the country? Yes, and it is true that there are 13,500 McDonald's restaurants between New York and California. Wayport is happily selling picks and shovels to miners. But the miners are not going to strike gold. For a fresh insight, I turned to Randy Battat, president and chief executive officer of Airvana, a mobile infrastructure provider. The free spectrum of Wi-Fi and its $100 access points have a lot of appeal, Battat notes. But the problem is that you need to get what wireless data to the wired Internet. A T1 line costs about $500 per lines per month, depending on the distance to the Internet service provider. On the other hand, the cellular towers and base stations are already in place.
ACCESSION #
13118255

 

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