TITLE

Shapiro's Syndrome: A Renewed Appreciation for Vital Signs

AUTHOR(S)
Klingler, Edna Toubes; Meyer, Kimberly
PUB. DATE
May 2004
SOURCE
Clinical Infectious Diseases;5/15/2004, Vol. 38 Issue 10, p1511
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Vital signs are an invaluable diagnostic tool, but in this era of modern medicine and expensive tests, important information obtainable at the patient's bedside is often over- looked. We report an unusual case, Shapiro's syndrome, in which an appreciation of temperature recordings was essential to diagnosis. We review this disorder and the thermoregulatory system.
ACCESSION #
13077226

 

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