TITLE

Survey of Physician Diagnostic Practices for Patients with Acute Diarrhea: Clinical and Public Health Implications

AUTHOR(S)
Hennessy, Thomas W.; Marcus, Ruthanne; Deneen, Valerie; Reddy, Sudha; Vugia, Duc; Townes, John; Bardsley, Molly; Swerdlow, David; Angulo, Frederick J.
PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Clinical Infectious Diseases;4/15/2004 Supplement, Vol. 38, pS203
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
To understand physician practices regarding the diagnosis of acute diarrhea! diseases, we conducted a survey, in 1996, of 2839 physicians in Connecticut, Georgia, Minnesota, Oregon, and California. Bacteria! stool culture was requested for samples from the last patient seen for acute diarrhea by 784 (44%; 95% confidence interval, 42%-46%) of 1783 physicians. Physicians were more likely to request a culture for persons with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, bloody stools, trave! to a developing country, diarrhea for >3 days, intravenous rehydration, or fever. Substantial geographic and specialty differences in culture-request practices were observed. Twenty-eight percent of physicians did not know whether stool culture included testing for Escheri chin coli 0157:H7; 40% did not know whether Yersinia or Vibrio species were included. These variabilities suggest a need for clinical diagnostic guidelines for diarrhea. Many physicians could benefit from education to improve their knowledge about tests included in routine stool examinations.
ACCESSION #
13046281

 

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