TITLE

Laboratory Practices for Stool-Specimen Culture for Bacterial Pathogens, Including Escherichia coli O157:H7, in the FoodNet Sites, 1995--2000

AUTHOR(S)
Voetsch, Andrew C.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Rabatsky-Ehr, Terry; Shallow, Sue; Cassidy, Maureen; Thomas, Stephanie M.; Swanson, Ellen; Zansky, Shelley M.; Hawkins, Marguerite A.; Jones, Timothy F.; Shillam, Pamela J.; Gilder, Thomas J. Van; Wells, Joy G.; Griffin, Patricia M.
PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Clinical Infectious Diseases;4/15/2004 Supplement, Vol. 38, pS190
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In 2000, we surveyed microbiologists in 388 clinical laboratories, which tested an estimated 339,000 stool specimens in 1999, about laboratory methods and policies for the routine testing of stool specimens for Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, and Vibrio species, Yersinia entercolitica, and Escherichia coil 0157:H7. The results were compared with those of similar surveys conducted in 1995 and 1997. Although these laboratories reported routinely testing for Salmonella, Shigella, and Campylobacter species, only 57% routinely tested for E. coil 0157:H7, 50% for IC entercolitica, and 50% for Vibrio species. The mean proportions of stool specimens that yielded these pathogens were as follows: Campyiobacter, 1.3% of specimens; Salmonella, 0.9%; Shigella, 0.4%; and E. coil 0157:H7, 0.3%. The proportion of laboratories that routinely tested for E. coil 0157:H7 increased from 59% in 1995 to 68% in 2000; however, the proportion of stool specimens tested decreased from 53% to 46%. E. coil 0157:H7 should be routinely sought in stool specimens submitted for microbiologic culture.
ACCESSION #
13045772

 

Related Articles

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics