TITLE

A-Bomb Data: Detection of Bias in the Life Span Study Cohort

AUTHOR(S)
Stewart, Alice
PUB. DATE
December 1997
SOURCE
Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements;Dec97 Supplement 6, Vol. 105, p1519
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
By drawing a distinction between A-bomb survivors with and without bomb-related injuries, it was possible to see that instead of the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort being a normal, homogenous population, there were significant differences between survivors with and without multiple injuries, and that these differences occurred largely among survivors who were under 10 or over 50 years of age when exposed, There also was a concentration of A-bomb-related injuries among survivors who eventually developed leukemia. So it is possible that deaths before 1950 had left the LSS cohort permanently biased in favor of persons who had high levels of resistance to all (early and late) effects of radiation. It is also possible that the high proportion of leukemia cases among the deaths of A-bomb survivors from 1950 to 1970 were because the radiation caused an initial leukocytosis followed by loss of immunologic competence. -- Environ Health Perspect 105 (Suppl 6): 1519-1521 (1997).
ACCESSION #
13036414

 

Related Articles

  • Models, Models Everywhere—Is There a Fit for Lifetime Risks? Boice Jr., John D. // JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute;Nov2010, Vol. 102 Issue 21, p1606 

    The article discusses the use of models to predict lifetime excess cancer risks following exposure to radiation. One study proposed a biologically based model for estimating lifetime cancer risks in Japanese atomic bomb survivors based on assumptions regarding the kinetics of radiation-induced...

  • A-bomb fallout. Thompson, Dick // Time International (South Pacific Edition);06/23/97, Issue 25, p70 

    States that the belief that any radiation is harmful to humans is being questioned as scientists study the contaminated survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb drops. How the survivors appear to live longer than contemporaries who were not exposed to radiation; Implications for...

  • A-bomb fallout. Thompson, Dick // Time;6/23/1997, Vol. 149 Issue 25, p50 

    States that the belief that any radiation is harmful to humans is being questioned as scientists study the contaminated survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb drops, who appear to live longer than contemporaries who were not exposed to radiation. Implications for nuclear storage...

  • Studies of the Mortality of Atomic Bomb Survivors.Report 12, Part I. Cancer: 1950-1990. Pierce, Donald A.; Shimizu, Yukiko; Preston, Dale L.; Vaeth, Michael; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko // Radiation Research;Aug2012, Vol. 178 Issue 2, pAV61 

    This continues the series of periodic general reports on cancer mortality in the cohort of A-bomb survivors followed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The follow-up is extended by the 5 years 1986-1990, and analysis includes an additional 10,500 survivors with recently estimated...

  • The Role of Epidemiology in the Detection of Harmful Effects of Radiation. Stewart, Alice // Environmental Health Perspectives;Feb2000, Vol. 108 Issue 2, p93 

    Expounds on the role of epidemiology in the detection of harmful effects of radiation. Inaccuracies of data on acute injuries of atomic bomb survivors taken from life span cohort studies; Preferability of using linear extrapolation of the high dose effects observed in atomic bomb survivors.

  • The Incidence of Leukemia, Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma among Atomic Bomb Survivors: 1950-2001. Hsu, Wan-Ling; Preston, Dale L.; Soda, Midori; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Kimura, Akiro; Kamada, Nanao; Dohy, Hiroo; Tomonaga, Masao; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Cullings, Harry M.; Suyama, Akihiko; Ozasa, Kotaro; Shore, Roy E.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko // Radiation Research;Mar2013, Vol. 179 Issue 3, p361 

    A marked increase in leukemia risks was the first and most striking late effect of radiation exposure seen among the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. This article presents analyses of radiation effects on leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma incidence in the Life Span Study...

  • Cancer Risks After Radiation Exposure in Middle Age. Shuryak, Igor; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J. // JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute;Nov2010, Vol. 102 Issue 21, p1628 

    Background Epidemiological data show that radiation exposure during childhood is associated with larger cancer risks compared with exposure at older ages. For exposures in adulthood, however, the relative risks of radiation-induced cancer in Japanese atomic bomb survivors generally do not...

  • Model averaging in the analysis of leukemia mortality among Japanese A-bomb survivors. Richardson, David; Cole, Stephen // Radiation & Environmental Biophysics;Mar2012, Vol. 51 Issue 1, p93 

    Epidemiological studies often include numerous covariates, with a variety of possible approaches to control for confounding of the association of primary interest, as well as a variety of possible models for the exposure-response association of interest. Walsh and Kaiser (Radiat Environ Biophys...

  • Radiofrequency Exposure Near High-voltage Lines. Vignati, Maurizio; Giuliani, Livio // Environmental Health Perspectives Supplements;Dec97 Supplement 6, Vol. 105, p1569 

    Many epidemiologic studies suggest a relationship between incidence of diseases like cancer and leukemia and exposure to 50/60 Hz magnetic fields. Some studies suggest a relationship between leukemia incidence in populations residing near high-voltage lines and the distance to these lines. Other...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics