TITLE

Smoking Linked to More Than 60 Percent of Overall Cancer Death Burden in Black Men; Tobacco Explains Disparity in Black-White Male Cancer Mortality Rates

PUB. DATE
April 2004
SOURCE
Ascribe Newswire: Medicine;4/28/2004, p45
SOURCE TYPE
Newswire
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A new study suggests that, the overall cancer death rate for African-American males would drop by nearly two-thirds, without any other intervention if their exposure to tobacco smoke was eliminated. African-American men have had the highest cancer burden of any group in the U.S. for decades, said study author Bruce Leistikow, associate professor of epidemiology and preventive medicine at UC Davis School of Medicine and Medical Center. Increasingly, research has linked smoking to deadly cancers other than lung cancer, including cancers of the colon, pancreas and prostate.
ACCESSION #
12982067

 

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