TITLE

Without Agency

AUTHOR(S)
Levi, Michael
PUB. DATE
May 2004
SOURCE
New Republic;5/3/2004, Vol. 230 Issue 16, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Argues that members of the U.S. Congress should have access to an objective source of scientific information to settle disputes over issues such as nuclear arms control and stem cell research. Claim that Democrats Richard Durbin and Carl Levin misrepresented the capabilities of the Robust Nuclear Earth Perpetrator in speeches delivered on the Senate floor; Claim that Democrats typically rely on nongovernmental organizations for their scientific information, while Republicans turn to conservative think tanks; Report that a non-partisan government agency, the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), was created in 1972, but was abolished during the Gingrich drive to cut the size of government; Discussion of why Congress' other support agencies--the General Accounting Office and the Congressional Research Service--together with the National Academy of Sciences cannot fill the scientific research gap left by the OTA; Details of efforts to revive the OTA.
ACCESSION #
12921403

 

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