TITLE

From Empire to Globalization: The New Zealand Experience

AUTHOR(S)
McLean, Janet
PUB. DATE
January 2004
SOURCE
Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies;Winter2004, Vol. 11 Issue 1, p161
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses nationalism and the national courts in New Zealand and examines the effects of globalization on both entities. Achievement of sovereignty from the British Empire; Integration of the common law and international law on human rights protections; Controversies surrounding the economic treaties entered by New Zealand.
ACCESSION #
12918702

 

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