TITLE

Factors influencing the relation of infant feeding to asthma and recurrent wheeze in childhood

AUTHOR(S)
Wright, A. L.; Holberg, C. J.; Taussig, L. M.; Martinez, D.; Martinez, F D
PUB. DATE
March 2001
SOURCE
Thorax;Mar2001, Vol. 56 Issue 3, p192
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
journal article
ABSTRACT
Background: The relationship between infant feeding and childhood asthma is controversial. This study tested the hypothesis that the relation between breast feeding and childhood asthma is altered by the presence of maternal asthma.Methods: Healthy non-selected newborn infants (n = 1246) were enrolled at birth. Asthma was defined as a physician diagnosis of asthma plus asthma symptoms reported on > or = 2 questionnaires at 6, 9, 11 or 13 years. Recurrent wheeze (> or = 4 episodes in the past year) was reported by questionnaire at seven ages in the first 13 years of life. Duration of exclusive breast feeding was based on prospective physician reports or parental questionnaires completed at 18 months. Atopy was assessed by skin test responses at the age of 6 years.Results: The relationship between breast feeding, asthma, and wheeze differed with the presence or absence of maternal asthma and atopy in the child. After adjusting for confounders, children with asthmatic mothers were significantly more likely to have asthma if they had been exclusively breast fed (OR 8.7, 95% CI 3.4 to 22.2). This relationship was only evident for atopic children and persisted after adjusting for confounders. In contrast, the relation between recurrent wheeze and breast feeding was age dependent. In the first 2 years of life exclusive breast feeding was associated with significantly lower rates of recurrent wheeze (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.2 to 0.9), regardless of the presence or absence of maternal asthma or atopy in the child. Beginning at the age of 6 years, exclusive breast feeding was unrelated to prevalence of recurrent wheeze, except for children with asthmatic mothers in whom it was associated with a higher odds ratio for wheeze (OR 5.7, 95% CI 2.3 to 14.1), especially if the child was atopic.Conclusion: The relationship between breast feeding and asthma or recurrent wheeze varies with the age of the child and the presence or absence of maternal asthma and atopy in the child. While associated with protection against recurrent wheeze early in life, breast feeding is associated with an increased risk of asthma and recurrent wheeze beginning at the age of 6 years, but only for atopic children with asthmatic mothers.
ACCESSION #
12915608

 

Related Articles

  • Asthma in preschool children: prevalence and risk factors. Haby, M. M.; Peat, J. K.; Marks, G. B.; Woolcock, A. J.; Leeder, S. R. // Thorax;Aug2001, Vol. 56 Issue 8, p589 

    Background--The prevalence of asthma in children has increased in many countries over recent years. To plan effective interventions to reverse this trend we need a better understanding of the risk factors for asthma in early life. This study was undertaken to measure the prevalence of, and risk...

  • Throat bacteria in neonates and later asthma.  // Archives of Disease in Childhood;May2008, Vol. 93 Issue 5, p422 

    The article discusses the connection between early stages of childhood asthma and throat colonization with bacterial pathogens at one-month old children between the children with asthmatic mothers. It suggests that bacterial infection may play a vital role in the early stages of childhood...

  • Clinical features assist diagnosis.  // New Zealand Doctor;3/8/2006, p18 

    Presents information on asthma and wheezing in children. Most common symptom of asthma; Types of irritants that can exaggerate the effect of aero-allergens; Causes of wheezing. INSETS: Emergency treatment for acute attacks;'United Airways' concept;Alcohol propellent, children and pregnancy.

  • FEEDING FRENZY. Springen, Karen // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);12/16/2002 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 140 Issue 25, p67 

    Reports on a study trying to draw a correlation between babies being fed in cribs and the development of asthma. Discussion of acid reflux and its connection with asthma; Statement that feeding a baby in a crib is bad but may not cause asthma; Discussion of children who are breast fed.

  • FEEDING FRENZY. Springen, Karen // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);12/16/2002 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 140 Issue 25, p55 

    Reports on a study trying to draw a correlation between babies being fed in cribs and the development of asthma. Discussion of acid reflux and its connection with asthma; Statement that feeding a baby in a crib is bad but may not cause asthma; Discussion of children who are breast fed.

  • Breastfeeding Protects Against Nonallergic Wheeze in Children.  // Pulmonary Reviews;Jun2009, Vol. 14 Issue 6, p25 

    The article discusses research being done on the association between breastfeeding and protection from nonatopic wheeze. It references a study by Gabriele Nagel and colleagues in a 2009 issue of the "European Respiratory Journal." The prevalence of breastfeeding ranged from 24% to 100%, and the...

  • Paediatric asthma.  // Thorax;Dec2006 Supplement 2, Vol. 61, pii26 

    The article presents abstracts related to pediatric asthma. They include "Childhood Wheeze, Peak Flow, and the Oxford Transport Strategy," "Body Mass Index, Physical Activity, and Beliefs About Exercise in Children With Asthma," and "Incidence of Adrenal Suppression in Children on High Dose...

  • RISK FACTORS FOR RECURRENT WHEEZING IN INFANTS. Lustosa, Wellyne Alves; Vieira Melo, Marta Lígia; de Andrade Isidório, Ubiraídys; de Sousa, Milena Nunes Alves; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Valenti, Vitor E.; Cardoso, Marco A.; de Assis, Elisangela Vilar // Revista Brasileira de Crescimento e Desenvolvimento Humano;2013, Vol. 23 Issue 2, p203 

    Introduction: wheezing is one of the most common respiratory symptoms in childhood. Regardless of the cause, it is a reason to seek medical care in emergency rooms, especially if there is recurrence of episodes. Very common in childhood, recurrent wheezing has its first episodes in the first...

  • Trends in asthma hospitalisation: is this related to prevention inhaler usage? MacFaul, R. // Archives of Disease in Childhood;Dec2004, Vol. 89 Issue 12, p1158 

    This article presents information on trends in asthma hospitalisation in England. Data shows that there has been a decline in hospital asthma admissions for children in England since 1990. This is the case even when the trend to describe some hospital admissions as due to viral wheeze or wheezy...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sign out of this library

Other Topics