TITLE

Inspiratory muscle maximum relaxation rate measured from submaximal sniff nasal pressure in patients with severe COPD

AUTHOR(S)
Kyroussis, D.; Johnson, L. C.; Hamnegard, C. -H.; Polkey, M. I.; Moxham, J.
PUB. DATE
March 2002
SOURCE
Thorax;Mar2002, Vol. 57 Issue 3, p254
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Slowing of the inspiratory muscle maximum relaxation rate (MRR) is a useful index of severe inspiratory muscle loading and potential fatigue and has been measured from the oesophageal pressure during sniffs in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to measure MRR and detect slowing using sniff nasal pressure in patients with COPD and to investigate the relationship between sniff oesophageal and sniff nasal MRR. Methods: Eight patients with severe COPD (mean FEV1 0.71; 26% predicted) were studied. Each subject performed submaximal sniff manoeuvres before and after walking to a state of severe dyspnoea on a treadmill. Oesophageal and gastric pressures were measured using balloon tipped catheters and nasal pressure was measured using an individually modelled nasal cast. MRR (% pressure fall/10 ms) was determined for each sniff and any change following exercise was reported as percentage of baseline to allow comparison of sniff nasal and oesophageal MRR. Results: At rest the mean (SE) sniff Poes MRR was 7.1(0.3) and the mean Pnasal MRR was 8.6 (0.1). At 1 minute following exercise there was a mean decrease in sniff Poes MRR of 33.7% (range 20.7- 53.4%) and a mean decrease in sniff Pnasal MRR of 28.2% (range 8.1-52.8%). The degree of slowing and time course of recovery was similar, with both returning to baseline values within 5-1 0 minutes. A separate analysis of the sniff pressures using only the nasal pressure traces demonstrated a similar pattern of slowing and recovery. Conclusions: It is possible to detect slowing of the inspiratory muscles non-invasively using sniff nasal pressures in patients with COPD. This could be a useful technique with which to measure severe and potentially fatiguing inspiratory muscle loading, both in clinical settings and during exercise studies.
ACCESSION #
12915257

 

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